One of the largest body shapes in the acoustic family, the dreadnought, was introduced in the early days of broadcast and recording, giving guitarists the extra measure of bass and volume they needed.

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In the early 1900s, broadcast technology made working class heroes of numerous acoustic guitar-wielding country and folk singers. Some of these artists complained that when gathered around a single microphone, they were unable to compete sonically with harmonized vocals or other instruments. Dreadnoughts were the answer to this need for improved volume and body.

In 1916, the word “dreadnought” referred to an all-big-gun battleship, the perfect metaphor for this big sounding guitar.

The most obvious component of our AVD1NT dreadnought’s big body is its projection and hearty acoustic character. The old school 12th-fret neck joint also contributes to this dreadnought’s powerful voice. As compared to the more modern 14th fret joint, the shorter and more stable neck does a better job of transferring string vibration to the guitar’s top (otherwise called a “soundboard”). This neck length difference allows for more effective placement of the bridge, nearer to the center of the top, the prime spot for optimizing vibration. 

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  • The top of the AVD1NT is solid Sitka Spruce, chosen for its likeness to the now rare Appalachian Spruce that was used on the classic old dreadnoughts.

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  • The advantage of the open slotted headstock is that it sets the strings at a sharper angle as they pass over the nut— the added pressure to that fulcrum point helps to maximize soundboard vibration.

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  • Ibanez luthiers tweaked the early designs and achieved perfect tonal balance with this slightly enlarged soundhole.

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  • The AVD1 features a classic bone nut and saddle, long considered to provide pure balanced tone.